NRC

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4 LITTLE THINGS YOU CAN DO TO GET A LOT FASTER If you’re trying to get faster—whether you’re gunning for a sub 6-, 9- or 12-minute mile, your main goal should be to challenge yourself to go slightly harder than usual. Here are a few quick, pace-pushing tips.

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GET TO KNOW YOUR PACES You should learn to run different distances at different paces. Generally speaking, you’ll get faster as the intervals get shorter and slower as the intervals get longer. The training plan will usually say, “run at Mile, 5K or 10K pace.” If you’re not familiar with what those paces are, then ask yourself, “What speed do I think I could sustain for each particular distance?” For example, 10K pace should feel like a pace that you could hold for 25 laps on the track (or 6 miles off), whereas Mile pace should feel like one that you could hold for just 4 laps. Use the Nike+ Running App to track your speed and analyze your progress from week to week.

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LET MUSIC POWER YOUR PACE Music can help push you to run faster. Set your target pace before your next run, and the Nike+ Pace Stations feature (developed with Spotify), will create a customized playlist based on your music preferences to match that speed, with songs to help keep you on pace. All you have to do is hit play and start running... fast.

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BUILD STRENGTH Part of getting faster involves staying healthy and becoming a more balanced athlete all-around. Cross training is key to gaining flexibility, mobility, power, strength and speed. Try to incorporate core-strengthening exercises, like planks, into your routine every week. You should also perform moves that target your hip flexors, quads, hamstrings, calves and Achilles regularly. Need ideas or inspiration? Check out some of the Nike+ Training Club (NTC) workouts.

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TAKE IT OFF THE TRACK An important thing to remember is that you don't need a track to build speed. You can complete interval-training sessions on a field, on the road or in a park. It can seriously be as simple as running hard for one minute; easy for one minute, and then repeating as many times as you wish—as long as you’re practicing how to run at different paces. Plus, tempo runs (runs that push you to go faster for longer distances) and hill workouts both serve to increase your speed and strength at the same time.